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Conn
The purpose of this page is to identify all saxes ever produced by Conn and their differences, and also to give a little history about the company as well.  First off, here is a list of serial numbers found on Conn saxophones, and their corresponding date.  Note: Stenciled saxophones (Conn saxes made under a different name) do not apply to this list.  Also, there may be a few errors, but this is as close as I know as to true.


Serial # ShipDate Serial # Shipdate
1 1895 260000 1934
2500 1896 263000 1935
3000 1898 271000 1936
3500 1899 278000 1937
4400 1901 284000 1938
5100 1902 285000 1939
6700 1903 288300 1940
8500 1904 295250 1941
9600 1905 304500 1942
108000 1906 309250 1943
12000 1907 309300 1944
13000 1908 310200 1945
15400 1909 314000 1946
17800 1910 320000 1947
21200 1911 327150 1948
22500 1912 332150 1949
25000 1913 227250 1950
30000 1914 341850 1951
35000 1916 341851 1952
40000 1917 354742 1953
50000 1919 359251 1954
58000 1920 500001 1955
64000 1921 571750 1956
83000 1922 652002 1957
101775 1923 718626 1958
124600 1924 779657 1959
145400 1925 834200 1960
179000 1926 898556 1961
193450 1927 949465 1962
209250 1928 C00501 1963
224600 1929 C73854 1964
237800 1930 E54106 1965
244700 1931 H31247 1966
256501 1933 J35274 1967
260000 1934 L20454 1968 

*Under Connstruction (sorry, you knew that pun was coming...)*
Conn Tuner Necks

At some point Conn manufactured necks with a microtuner (at least before 1921).  What the microtuner did basically, is lengthened and shortened the neck to tune the saxophone, without moving the mouthpiece and accidentally moving the reed.  Conn made the microtuner with both a overslung octave mechanism (see upper) and an underslung version (lower).  I'm not sure if these were available at the same time, or if there was a cutoff period.  The underslung octave neck, is from a Conn with a serial number in the 249,000 range (between 1931-1932).


 

1908(sn 14xxx) High Pitch Soprano

This curved soprano was made by Conn in 1908 during a time when two pitch standards existed in the musical community.  This soprano is tuned to A=457, or high pitch, while other instruments (and most instruments manufactured today) were tuned to A=440, or low pitch, which is today's pitch standard.  On most Conn instruments the difference between high and low pitch was clearly marked with either the letter 'H', for high pitch, or the letter 'L', for low pitch, under the right hand thumb rest below the serial number.  Instruments that are high pitch (A=457) are generally unplayable with low pitch instruments since they're nearly impossible to be "brought down" to the standard for over the past 50 years, A=440.  Although the two pitches are "just" 17 vibrations per second away, this is extremely far in the musical world, and when both high and low pitch instruments are played simultaneously, they can create some of the most ear piercing "harmony" imaginable.  As can be seen in the picture, in 1908 Conn saxophones didn't have a range up to high F or F#.  Instead their instruments were only keyed up to high Eb.  Also the "buttons" which today are usually covered with pearls, were simply metal.
 
 





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